The Brain and Marijuana – How the Brain Is Negatively Affected When You Smoke Marijuana

Cannabis is a complex molecule which has over 400 cannabinoids. Cannabinoids are the chemicals which give marijuana their ability to make an user feel high. THC (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) is the key active ingredient in the marijuana plant. THC is a cannabinoid. CBD Oil Wholesale

A substance called anandamide isone of the natural cannabinoids in the brain. THC copies the actions of anandamide. THC binds with the cannabinoid receptors making the brain believe it is naturally producing anadamide. It tricks the brain! Long-term use of marijuana can clog the pathways that chemicals corner (synapses) and slow/stop development of endorphins, or “feel good” chemicals, that the brain naturally produces. Listed here are a set of areas in the mind that are damaged by pot use:

Cannabinoid receptors are abundant in:

Cerebellum——-body movement/coordination

Hippocampus—–learning/memory

Cerebral Cortex—-higher intellectual functions

Nucleus Accumbens—–reward middle

Basal Ganglia—-(unconscious) movement control

Cannabinoid receptors are average in:

Hypothalamus—-body housekeeping functions (body temp, salt, normal water, sugar)

Amygdala—-emotional response/fear/flight or fight

Spinal Cord—-peripheral sensation/pain

Brain Stem—-sleep and excitement levels, motor control

Central Gray—-analgesia/pain control

Nucleus of solo tract—-visceral sensation, nausea/vomiting

Even now not sure why this problems? Imagine that you are an individual who smokes marijuana on a daily basis. Each of the above noted areas of the human brain are being damaged every day. That means that your short-term memory is not at all times useful (eg. how often will you forget where you left your keys? ) and your ability to follow directions, especially complicated ones, is inhibited. An individual may need to be reminded of what was said or may prefer to write things down to bear in mind the instructions. You may realize that you are not as coordinated as you once were. This may be more apparent to others than to the individual him or himself.